Pollyanna Rainbow Sunshine Goes with the Meme

Anna-Liza here. This has been going around the knitblogosphere, and I’ve seen it several different places. I got this particular version from cosymakes.

Mark with bold the things you have ever knit, with italics the ones you plan to do sometime, and leave the rest. There are a few I left plain because I don’t currently plan to do them, but the key word there is “currently”.

Afghan
I-cord
Garter stitch
Knitting with metal wire
Shawl
Stockinette stitch
Socks: top-down
Socks: toe-up
Knitting with camel yarn
Mittens: Cuff-up

Mittens: Tip-down
Hat
Knitting with silk
Moebius band knitting
Participating in a KAL
Sweater
Drop stitch patterns
Knitting with recycled/secondhand yarn (if grocery bags count!)
Slip stitch patterns
Knitting with banana fiber yarn
Domino knitting (=modular knitting)
Twisted stitch patterns
Knitting with bamboo yarn
Two end knitting
Charity knitting
Knitting with soy yarn
Cardigan
Toy/doll clothing
Knitting with circular needles
Baby items
Knitting with your own handspun yarn
Slippers
Graffiti knitting
Continental knitting
Designing knitted garments
Cable stitch patterns (incl. Aran)
Lace patterns
Publishing a knitting book

Scarf
Teaching a child to knit
American/English knitting (as opposed to continental)
Knitting to make money
Buttonholes
Knitting with alpaca
Fair Isle knitting
Norwegian knitting
Dying with plant colors
Knitting items for a wedding
Household items (dishcloths, washcloths, tea cosies…)
Knitting socks (or other small tubular items) on one or two circulars                                                                                

Knitting with someone else’s handspun yarn
Knitting with dpns
Holiday related knitting

Teaching a male how to knit (so would male knitters change this to “teaching a female”? I left it in, but it’s annoying me)
Bobbles
Knitting for a living
Knitting with cotton
Knitting smocking
Dying yarn
Steeks
Knitting art

Knitting two socks on two circulars simultaneously
Fulling/felting
Knitting with wool
Textured knitting
Kitchener stitch                                                         

Purses/bags
Knitting with beads
Swatching
Long Tail CO
Entrelac
Knitting and purling backwards
Machine knitting
Knitting with self patterning/self striping/variegated yarn
Stuffed toys
Baby items
Knitting with cashmere
Darning
Jewelry
Knitting with synthetic yarn
Writing a pattern
Gloves
Intarsia
Knitting with linen
Knitting for preemies
Tubular CO
Freeform knitting
Short rows
Cuffs/fingerless mits/armwarmers
Pillows
Knitting a pattern from an online knitting magazine
Rug
Knitting on a loom
Thrummed knitting
Knitting a gift
Knitting for pets
Shrug/bolero/poncho
Knitting with dog/cat hair
Hair accessories
Knitting in public

What have you learned to do that has marked a definite change in your knitting life? Gorsh, I don’t know! I love learning new stuff and hitting that just-right level of challenging but not frustrating enough to make me cry or swear. I think the accumulated learning that has made me confident enough to improvise (and to know when not to improvise) is the biggest thing so far. I am much more likely to tackle something new and scary-looking now than I was as a beginning knitter, and I would rate myself as an intermediate knitter at this point. Maybe “advanced intermediate” in some areas.

Knitting Eris has taught me a lot. And I’m close to finishing my first (worsted-weight) lace project. Those have both been big learning experiences, and I’d say the two of them together have made me a more confident and adventurous knitter.

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3 thoughts on “Pollyanna Rainbow Sunshine Goes with the Meme

  1. polarbears

    The thing that has made the most difference in my knitting life is the internet! Shopping, blogs, Google even emailing photos of FOs to my Mom. The entire world is now right in the studio of my rural house.

    Reply
  2. annaliza Post author

    Polarbears is right! The internet has changed my knitting life dramatically (as well as everything else). And it has made it possible for a lot of small handcraft businesses to survive and thrive which wouldn’t have a chance if they had to rely on people who could physically visit them.

    Reply

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